Here are some of the fantastic Young Entrepreneurs we've helped

Amanda BrockwellAmanda Brockwell | Amanda’s Blue Orchid Florist, Couture Fascinators & Amanda’s Pixel Art
Age started in business: 19

“I went to Sydney Smith School in West Hull and started work in a local florists and newsagents. I first had my business idea when I was aged 19 with lots of hope, only to be laughed at by landlords and wholesalers who wouldn’t give me credit.”

“I then heard about the John Cracknell Youth Enterprise Bank. Having met Maureen Foers OBE, its chair, I submitted an application and received a grant of £700 in 2008 alongside business advice. I set up my florist shop on Hessle Road, which was opened by the then Lord Mayor Cllr Brenda Petch. I had an army of customers who loved my range – but it wasn’t easy and I made plenty of mistakes! Perseverance paid off and I went on to be Hull’s Young Entrepreneur of the Year in 2009.”

“I have made several appearances as part of Global Entrepreneurship Week alongside BBC Apprentice stars Claire Young and Ruth Badger. After six years I closed my business to peruse a normal family life and got married to Chris and had a son, though I did buy and sell things on eBay to keep my hand in. In 2016 I decided to make an official comeback working from home as a wedding and events florist, continuing with my hats and fascinators business and starting a fresh new company which explores my artistic hobbies.”

TOP TIP “Don’t let anyone put you down. If you believe you can do it, go for it! Work out your expenses – rent and bills can be high, they have to be paid before you can make a profit. Don’t undervalue your product! And you can always ask for support from Women’s Enterprise in the Humber and the John Cracknell Youth Enterprise Bank.”

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Amy Amy Chisholm | Deja Vu Beauty Salon
Age started in business: 17

“I first started out in business at 17-years-old providing the general public with nail enhancements. At the same time I was studying in Bridlington at East Riding College by training to progress my skills further in beauty therapy. Shortly after I qualified as a beauty therapist, I carried on working in the salon where I rented a chair. However, that Christmas the owner of the salon was leaving and I would no longer be able to operate in that way. We had a meeting and on 1 January 2015 I became the owner of the salon.”

“Then I started to build my business up, offering more treatments and I looked into redecorating my premises. I contacted Bridlington’s Business Centre and had support there for my business and I also got in contact with the John Cracknell Youth Enterprise Bank and I applied for a grant to build up my business more. Charles and Mike came out to meet me to see what my plans were. The reason I applied for the grant was to buy beauty equipment and furniture so I could carry on with my business.”

“The John Cracknell Youth Enterprise Bank granted me £950 and that was enough for me to buy everything I needed to carry on. I then entered the Badgers Sett Enterprise Challenge and came second and won £500. I used this money to further my business more.”

“My business is very established now with myself, one fully qualified therapist and a beauty apprentice and I am hopeful that I will soon be able to employ another beauty apprentice.”

TOP TIP “However young you are, never doubt that you can’t build up your business. Always ask people for support: colleges, business centres, support centres, the John Cracknell Youth Enterprise Bank, etc. And as regards taking on staff for your business, try all routes and you’ll find what will suit your business.”

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Ben RaineyBen Rainey | DJ/entertainment
Age started in business: 19

“After getting funded by the John Cracknell Youth Enterprise Bank through Charles and Mike, my DJing career went from strength to strength. It helped me take the stress out of funding the start-up costs of equipment and meant that I could focus on developing my skills to become a Club Level DJ.”

“Within the last two years I have worked in some of the biggest clubs in the North East: mainly The Sugarmill and Revolution Bar in Hull, but I also have played guest DJ sets in Leeds, Manchester and Sheffield. I also got the opportunity of a main set at a festival in Driffield in front of 2,500 people which was an amazing experience. I am also part of an event called House of Tequila which is in Hull and runs monthly and has a massive following and reputation.”

“The funding helped me out by paying for equipment I needed upfront to start DJing such as a laptop, decks, headphones, insurance, cables and tuition. I have been on a DJ course in Leeds to learn some advanced skills which have helped me stand out as a DJ in the local scene. I have also invested my time and money into going and seeing other DJs play to watch and learn.”

“I’ve connected through social media to the right people to get my name known around the UK and that has led to gigs and enquiries across the UK. I am really excited for the future of my DJing business and thanks to Charles and Mike for helping me start my journey. In 2014 I was invited to be a guest speaker at the Post 16 Enterprise event in Hull during Global Entrepreneurship Week.”

TOP TIP: “Before you go out and buy the latest equipment thinking it will do all the work for you, work on your skills, give people a reason to choose you over your competition and be confident in what you can offer them. The end product is everything, not what equipment you have.”

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CloieCloie Hockney | Handmade by Cloie
Anything handmade from clothing and alterations to accessories, homeware and keepsakes.
Age started in business: 18

“I started out as an Art and Design student at St Mary’s college. I always wanted to go into something creative but I never expected that it would be fashion.”

“During the summer, after leaving college in 2013, I started to experiment making my own clothing. I realised that this was actually something that I was good at and I really enjoyed doing it, so I decided to progress onto Hull School of Art and Design and study a degree in BA (Hons) Fashion.

“It was here that I learned all of my knowledge about designing, pattern-cutting and constructing and fitting garments. I am a tall person who struggles to find long enough clothing, so my course inspired me to set up a business so that I could create made-to- measure clothing for all ages.”

“I started selling to friends and family on Facebook and eventually set up a Facebook page called Handmade by Cloie, which is what prompted me to make lots of new items. I heard about John Cracknell Youth Enterprise Bank and with their help I was able to buy a good quality iron and an embroidery machine, which lets me personalise my items. This is especially great for my Memory Keepsake range as it allows the customer to make their item that little bit more personal.”

TOP TIP: “Do your research first, find out what is really in demand in the area, or where there is a current gap in the market. For me, there wasn’t any affordable, handmade, made-to-measure clothing.”

 Find Chloe on Facebook 

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University of Hull, Kingston Upon Hull, East Yorkshire, United Kingdom, 05 August, 2015. Pictured: Josh PorterJoshua Porter | BetaJester Ltd
Games and software
Age started in business: 21

“The dream started back in the first year of university. I found a group of friends who had the same passion that I did for games and software and wanted to take it further. We all dreamed of starting our own business but thought it would follow getting jobs, making connections, money and experience in industry. We were wrong.”

“We have been making games since our first year of university but our main business is bespoke software solutions and virtual reality experiences for clients. During our final year of study we searched hard for ways to implement our dream sooner and that’s when we found the John Cracknell Youth Enterprise Bank

“Being the only one that was eligible for the support out of our group, I inquired with Charles Cracknell about funding opportunities and after meeting with Charles and Mike Notarantonio and getting their valuable advice we gained support from the Youth Bank. This support was used to buy office equipment enabling us to produce software content, which we then started to produce for clients. However this wasn’t immediate, we struggled to find solid work for many months in the beginning but we never gave up on our dream, we continued to search for work whilst improving our own knowledge and industry connections through attending as many networking events as we could.

“Eventually, we found our first piece of work and we’ve been building, learning and growing from every consecutive client. Now, we are producing charts showing all the work we are getting allowing us to see when we can even fit work in. We’re very happy with where we are but we won’t forget our roots and who helped us at the start when we needed it most.”

TOP TIP “Develop persistence. It will mean you can overcome hurdles that are put in front of you and you won’t be fazed when you encounter blockades to your success. Truly committing yourself to what you want to do will not only be recognised by those around you, but will also bring you satisfaction when you achieve your goals.”

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Katie DawsonKatie Dowson | Lady Kachello
Handmade clothing and accessories for women and children
Age started in business: 18

“Lady Kachello was created in summer 2014, making handmade clothing and accessories for children and women. I started my business due to having a passion for sewing from a young age. I am currently studying a BA (Hons) Fashion degree at The Hull School of Art and Design which has given me the knowledge to create my own patterns and has taught me how to make clothing to a high standard. From starting my own business,

I have all the different social media platforms to sell my clothing. I have done giveaways and promotions through Facebook and Instagram, which gained me more followers and consequently more orders due to increased awareness. This has helped my business in many different ways due to lots more people seeing the clothing and accessories that I make.

I also attend lots of craft stalls; at the stalls I have a range of leaflets that I give out promoting offers and discounts that I am running at the time. Furthermore, I also distribute business cards at these events so that customers can remember me and easily contact me through various platforms and so that they can find me on social media to make contact.”

In May 2016 Katie received a grant of £1,200 for her business to purchase an embroidery machine and appropriate software alongside a mentor from the John Cracknell Youth Enterprise Bank.

TOP TIP “Believe that you can do it. Social media platforms are also a great way to promote your business for free; the more you post the more likes/followers you get. And check out the John Cracknell Youth Enterprise Bank.”

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Louise UpfoldLouise Upfold | Weasie Wears
Unique clothing
Age started in business: 22

“Weasie Wears came about as I finished university and struggled to get into the design sector. Contacting the John Cracknell Youth Enterprise Bank for advice, they sat down with me and we hatched out a plan for me to create my own clothing company. It developed very quickly with me taking part in pop-up shops and having market stalls at events in Hull. I definitely found running my own business trying at times, as I also had a part-time job to support myself financially. However, the opportunities and knowledge I have gained through developing Weasie Wears are amazing.”

“In 2014 I put in an application for the Badgers Sett Enterprise Challenge. The idea was to pitch your idea to a panel of judges including Ruth Badger, and they would award you grant money based on what you deserved. I happened to win the competition and was awarded £1,300 in grant money as well as a business meeting with Ruth Badger to improve Weasie Wears. This experience was amazing: I got the advice that I needed to enable the business to grow, I won money to buy better equipment, but also the whole experience of speaking to a panel and putting my idea across is something I can take with me throughout my career in whatever direction I go in.”

“As part of the competition I also won an office base in the city centre provided by Hull City Council. I am now expanding as a business and moving into Hull Youth Support Trust premises at 161 High Street as the next stage of my entrepreneurial journey.

“The last two years have very much been a juggling act; I have had to had a part-time job to support myself, this has meant that any money made by the business could be put back into it and which has allowed it to keep on growing and developing.”

“The idea of Weasie Wears is still developing and I think that is part of being an entrepreneur: you need to be able to develop and not feel ashamed if your original idea hasn’t worked. Weasie Wears is still an ongoing business – I feel I need to achieve more to be able to make the business my primary job, but that is the next step for me as an entrepreneur.”

TOP TIP: “Take any opportunity that comes your way because you never know where it will lead. Everything is a learning experience and this will follow you through life and even if you decide you want to change career paths, it gives you experiences that other jobs don’t and this gives you an advantage in whatever career you choose. This will make you more desirable for perspective employers and even going on to higher education.”

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R and MMacaulay Dunham & Ryan Wilson | R&M Maintenance
Property repairs and maintenance
Age started in business: 17

“We started at Hull Training in August 2015 studying a level-2 NVQ in Maintenance Operations. During our time at college we learned all the different building trades: plastering, joinery, bricklaying, decorating etc. Both of us thoroughly enjoyed our jobs and wanted to progress in this profession, wanting to eventually go into property development and lettings. We had many discussions whilst at college regarding wanting to start up our own maintenance company.

"With some support from our families we started completing small jobs for family and friends, eventually gaining additional work from word of mouth. When the workload started to increase we decided on a company name, R&M Maintenance, to give us a more professional look. We also created a Facebook page, through which we now find and receive regular work. Once work has been completed we post photos of the work carried out, if the customer gives permission, onto the page. This lets prospective customers see our work and gives them access to reviews of our service. We aim to work with our customers to provide an excellent service to suit all budgets. Recently we have invested in getting business cards, flyers, signs and clothing printed to help us advertise our business.”

“When we began to get a reasonable amount of work as R&M we realised we could make a success of it sooner than we were expecting. We were then introduced to the John Cracknell Youth Enterprise Bank; they helped us set up a business plan and cash flow forecast to apply for the youth enterprise grant and helping us to reach our goals.”

TOP TIP “Work hard and set realistic and achievable goals. You need to research your potential customers and completion to see how you can make yourselves stand out from the rest. Set up a business plan and cash flow forecast, embrace social media to advertise your company and gain feedback to help you to improve your service.”

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Millie NotarantonioMillie Notarantonio | Millie Rose
Age started in business: 12

“I started producing personalised mugs for friends and family after my dad had received some new equipment for his workshop and was offered a small mug press and small printer which he thought would be something I might like to try, as I am quite creative.”

“Once I had started to make and sell the mugs, I realised that there were lots of other things that I could use the printer for and I soon added more products to the range of things I could make for people. I even created my own character range that could be personalised with hair colour, eye colour and outfits. These proved to be really popular and I started printing these onto mugs, phone and tablet cases, compact cases and even jute bags.”

“At 12 years old I applied to the John Cracknell Youth Enterprise Bank and was supported with a grant, which allowed me to buy a quality heat press that made a big difference to the quality and quantity of the flat items I make, like t-shirts and phone cases. I also entered and won the Badgers Sett Enterprise Challenge competition in 2015, winning £1,200 and was able to buy a multi press that allowed me to print an even wider range of different shaped mugs, cups and flasks”

“I have my own website where I sell my products, but I also use Facebook and Twitter to promote the things I have made for people. Most of my sales come through social media or from friends recommending me to other people. I make a lot of one-off gifts for people but I have also done many larger orders of t-shirts or mugs for businesses holding events or wanting promotional items.”

“As I am still at school I do have to manage my time well due to balancing homework, time with my friends, sport and dance as well as not letting customers down – so it can be challenging sometimes, but I do get support when needed.” “I really enjoy being creative and I also love being able to have my own money that I have earned myself.”

TOP TIP: “If you have an idea don’t be afraid to try it no matter how young you are and if your aged 21 and under apply to the John Cracknell Youth Enterprise Bank.”

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ThomasThomas Arran | T Arran Photography
Age started in business: 17

“As a photographer with a great eye for detail, I focus on the little things that may otherwise go unnoticed. Combined with my contemporary and modern style, I have developed a diverse range of photography for clients throughout Hull and the UK. Since starting a business at the age of 17, I have established great long- standing working relationships with many of the businesses throughout the city. An office situated in the centre of Hull, supplied by Hull City Council as a result of winning the Badgers Sett Enterprise Challenge, has allowed me to embrace Hull’s culture whilst also being accessible to any client’s requests at short notice.”

“Training at Hull College I undertook a two-year BTEC photography course enabling me to develop my knowledge in my lifelong passion. Completing the course with a triple distinction, I then went on to an Advanced Creative and Digital Media Apprenticeship, being the first person in the country to undertake photography as an apprenticeship. Whilst participating on an apprenticeship I still managed my business during evenings and weekends. A grant and support, provided by the John Cracknell Youth Enterprise Bank, allowed me to make the transition from my apprenticeship to being a full-time, self-employed photographer much more easily than would otherwise have been the case, providing me with valuable equipment and the mentorship that I required!”

“Starting a business at such a young age, I was awarded the Hull Young Entrepreneur of the Year award in 2013 and I am the official photographer for the Hull Youth Enterprise Partnership. From this I then became a mentor to other young people aiming to start businesses and I regularly give talks to photography students within the city and around the country. I am now expanding as a business and have moved into the Hull Youth Support Trust premises at 161 High Street as the next stage of my entrepreneurial journey.”

TOP TIP: “Don’t turn down any opportunity when starting a business, as you never know where it may lead!”

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